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New Texas Law to Allow Open Carry of Swords and Machetes

July 28, 2017

Many people are left wondering how a new law regrading swords, Bowie knives, and machetes in Texas will affect public places in Texas. As of September, along with a slew of other laws going into effect, adults in Texas will be legally allowed to openly carry knives with blades longer than 5.5 inches.

 

House Bill 1935, a bill lobbied for by national organization Knife Rights, repealed what many collectors considered vague wording in the law and will allow people older than 18 to carry blades longer than 5 ½ inches in public, including knives, swords and spears of any size.

 

"Carrying a sword down the street, carrying a Bowie knife down the street... completely legal. Machetes if you want to," said general manager at the House of Blades in Fort Worth, Ahnna Escobedo (according to CBS news).

 

"I think it was more to give people more rights and to make sure they felt like they were free to carry what they wanted," Escobedo said. "Texas move right there, sure."

 

HB 1935 was originally shelved after police in Austin said a man killed a student at UT and injured three others with a large, hunting knife. 

 

There are some places where the new law won't apply -- including schools, prisons, hospitals, amusement parks or places of worship. Long blades are still banned at sports events. And you can't bring your sword into a bar, either. 

 

"The idea that someone is walking down the street with a sharp object maybe larger than your toddler, that could be pretty alarming for people," said Escobedo.

 

 

Some people feel the law will not change much for the public, finding it to be similar to the recently pass law regrading open carry guns. 

 

Escobedo agrees, and said she is often more concerned about the smaller blades. "Just to be honest, the time and effort it takes to unsheathe something this large versus taking something like this out of your pocket, this is going to be a lot faster," said Escobedo.

 

 

*Sources used in this article were curated from CBS News.

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